GPSisWrong
Seems obvious, right? And yet, stories like this are still relatively common place. What is really egregious in this case is that this faux pas was committed by a commercial tour bus driver.

Confirm the address or location on a map (heck even maps.google.com). You will be disappointed if you arrive in Dayton, Ky when you intended to go to Dayton, OH.

I am a little surprised that the sensors on your smartphone are more accurate than a dedicated wearable device for tracking activity. Besides, the phone has the advantage of not being a single tasker, like a wearable.

This meme just keeps hanging on. If you are at all familiar with the node.js/io.js ‘forking’ schism, this video is particularly funny.

cincyHistorical
Happy Birthday, Cincinnati. A quick tour through all things Cincinnati.

I am just blown away that there are employees that would sell a user’s password for $150USD. Ii am even more blown away by the fact that they would admit to it.

Screenshot 2014-12-29 at 11.09.09 AM
This is a handy new development that allows you to run Linux (Crouton) in a window on a Chromebook. It also addresses some of the difficulties of copy and paste from ChromeOS and Crouton which is something I have been missing very much.

Obviously, you can run Crouton without this plugin by switching between full screen Crouton and full screen ChromeOS, but these just feels more seemless and integrated.

YubiKey Neo

YubiKey Neo

Outstanding detailed article on using two-factor authentication with the Mac OS X operating system. Note that there is a lot of good follow up in the comments section as well.

I bought a yubikey neo back in October and have been using it with Google’s U2F implementation. I think that this is a smart way to go security-wise and I am glad to see that Google is making it easier to take advantage of. You can also opt for the less expensive yubikey standard if you don’t have a need for the Near Field Communications (NFC) capability on the yubikey.

2014-09-01 14.41.53I found this posting to be a bit swear-y (you’ve been warned), but otherwise on the money.

The final paragraph nails it (I have definitely seen my share of those ‘success’ messages:

Above all else, have a wonderful holiday season and give your teams a break until the code freeze is lifted in mid-January. Then you can get back to shoving Agile on people, making them work 60 hours a week again and then having your directors send “we did it the Agile way!!!!” success messages after the project you executed took production offline, took twice as long to finish and cost 3 times as much.

2014-12-13 13.16.52
Happy New Year! 2014 was filled with ups and downs (as to be expected). Hopefully, 2015 will see projects successfully completed and new directions explored. Coming into the new year with a bit of flu has been kind of a drag, but things should start picking up again in a few days.

2014-11-30 13.25.40-2

UPS delivery fail

UPS delivery fail

It only shows up when you are off line (and currently only in the Chrome Canary builds). That would be fun for about 2 minutes.

2014-11-11 16.25.48

I saw that Google is testing a password generator for the Chrome browser. Hmm, I wonder if that means that they will stop storing passwords in clear text?

Password-generating tools like LastPass, 1Password, RoboForm, and others are a mainstay of browser accessories, and are often recommended by security experts because they can help create and manage “strong” passwords. “Strong” refers to passwords that are difficult for hackers and computers to guess. Google’s effort, if it makes it into the regular version of Chrome, could encourage other browser makers to build password generators and make the field more competitive.

1Password has the advantage that it is multi-platform and not tied to a single browser, which I consider to be a very good thing. Having each browser create its own incompatible password manager would be even worse that each browser having its own incompatible HTML interpreter.

Another recent post, again focused on API design, but could/should apply to all tech efforts (The Four Principles of Successful APIs). This time the guidance takes a slightly different approach:

    1. Understand The Strategy
    2. Decide Who You Are Really Designing For
    3. Start Small and Iterate
    4. Architect for the Long Term with Abstraction

#2 sounds like a component of #1 – your target user base should be part of your strategy. #3 is a good opportunity to apply the consistency principle from the previous posting. #4 is interesting because abstraction seems to be a hard concept for developers who tend to think that API = CRUD overlay.

I had to chuckle when I read through this post titled When crafting your API strategy, put design first. It is very high-level and could/should apply to anything. Here are the main points:

    Design for consistency
    Design for scale
    Design for people

Check. Yes to all of these. I suppose some folks need to be reminded of this. Especially the ‘sling code first and declare victory at some arbitrary point’ proponents. The ones with 60 hours of production downtime a month because design ‘just slows them down’. Apparently downtime doesn’t slow them down, but it sure slows down the consumers.

Another chuckle was this paragraph, which is nearly a direct quote from me (emphasis added):

Planning too little is dangerous. But so is planning too much. This isn’t a science experiment to find the ideal design. Perfection isn’t the goal: consistency is.

IBM’s Watson is not just good for game shows – apparently it takes a turn at bartending: This Cocktail Concocted By IBM’s Watson Isn’t Half Bad

TL;DR version:

What You’ll Need:

    1.5 oz. coconut milk
    3 oz. white rum
    3 oz. banana juice
    4 oz. pure pineapple juice
    1/2 oz. fresh lime juice
    10(ish) drops blue food coloring
    2 USB sticks for garnish (optional)

To Finish:

    5 oz. Sprite or similar soda